Kaur Manroop, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Thursday, March 23, 2017

Should the chief executive be allowed to take holidays?

The chief executive should be allowed to take holidays, but not for a long period, because the position carries a lot of responsibility. They have a stressful job so they should be allowed to take a week off every year.

 

  Rai Anna, Former student (2014 - 2015)

  Posted: Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Should pro-democracy Election Committee members vote for a pro-establishment candidates for CE?

The chief executive election is around the corner. Understandably, public scrutiny over the nomination process and CE candidates has been fierce over the past few months. This increased attention has led to greater political participation and resulted in some significant outcomes. I specifically refer to the city's democratic camp seizing a record quarter of the seats in the committee that will pick Hong Kong's next leader on March 26. 

As the pan-democrats now have more influence over electing the new CE, the debate is how they should utilize this new-found power. Some have even suggested that they should vote for a pro-establishment candidate because the odds are still not in favour of the pro-democracy camp. I don't agree.

The two groups have completely different political beliefs. The pro-democracy camp comprises different political parties but they share the same core values such as universal suffrage, freedom of expression, and the rule of law. If they were to endorse a pro-establishment candidate, it would be an act of giving up their cherished dreams. Some experts may see the wisdom of choosing a candidate from the opposing camp as a case of selecting the "lesser of two evils". However, this ignores the value of political competition.

Pan-democrats have never shied away from challenging the government on key issues that affect the community. They have won many important battles, thanks to their never-say-die spirit. Not giving an inch now may lead to a pan-democrat never being able to take part in a CE election, but it also means standing up for the values they cherish.

Another important factor to consider is public trust. Election committee members are voted in by members of functional constituencies who expect the person they support to represent their views. The public spoke when 326 seats of the nearly 1200 member. Election Committee were won by the pro-democracy camp. Disrespecting their opinion would only break the trust placed by the people on the Election Committee members. 

In the current politically charged atmosphere, it is easy to be disheartened by the status quo. Nevertheless, pan-democrats must remember not every battle can by won, and small steps would eventually help change the political landscape for the better.

 

  Saima, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Wednesday, March 03, 2017

Life is just a click away!

Let’s drink to that!

What else but soft drink? They are so addictive that I sometimes wonder if they contain a special drug. At one time, I was determined to give up, but after a few weeks, I needed a “drink”. Perhaps it’s because you can buy soft drink almost anywhere, and they are very cheap. Even my PE teacher wants me to give up soft drinks but it’s so difficult. Soft drinks win!

 

  Reshmi Silva, 15, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Wednesday, March 01, 2017

What is the best way to deal with stress?

Yoga breathing exercises are a simple way to cope with stress. Yoga helps improve both your mental and physical health. It can also boost your self-esteem and help you concentrate on the tasks at hand instead of worrying about things that happened in the past. These exercises also have other benefits that are more helpful than having a daily cup of coffee!

 

  Saba Ifkhar, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Friday, Feb 24, 2017

Reel in your thoughts : Super-villain with style 

Forget heroes or saints. I would go for my personal favourite – the joker. He may be a lunatic, but he has good insight into the real world. Unlike heroes, he doesn’t fight darkness, he embraces it, and that’s something we all need to learn from him. Pus he’s a super-villain with style! I think he’s pretty not and has a great personality. I just hope I’d have my very own purple Lamborghini.

 

  Saba Ifkhar, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Friday, Feb 17, 2017

Who would you choose?

Truth is stranger than fiction

Comparing a fictional character to a real-life dictator would be very unfair. I think Donald Trump is worse than Dolores Umbridge. In Harry Potter, Umbridge is extremely unforgiving and hostile towards the students and wizards of Hogwarts. But it doesn’t change the fact that, ultimately, she’s just a character in a movie and in a book. Trump is just as vehement and bitter, but the difference is that this is real life, and millions of innocent people have to face the consequences of his actions. He abuses his powers although he knows he’s a very influential person.

  Mubassara Sirin, 15, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Friday, Feb 17, 2017

Who would you choose?

Trump is a bore

 

I would say US President Donald Trump, because he does not respect people from other races and religions. Schools usually have students from all over the world. He would be a boring teacher anyway.

 

  Saba Ifkhar, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Wednesday, Jan 18, 2017

What event would you erase from history?

I’d erase the Kashmir conflict that began in 1947. In that year, when India and Pakistan separated, the ruler of Kashmir chose to keep the region independent.

However, since Kashmir is on the border between India and Pakistan, it caused a big dispute between the two countries that continues even today. It has stirred unrest not just between Indians and Pakistanis, but among the people in Kashmir.

The conflict has led to the deaths of hundreds of Indian and Pakistani soldiers as well as innocent people in the region. If the ruler of Kashmir officially chose one side, then these drastic consequences wouldn’t have taken place. Another war is the last thing the world needs!

 

  Saba Ifkhar, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Wednesday, Jan 04, 2017

What advice would you give to someone twice your age?

Do more with less. I’m sure even a person twice my age fells insecure at ties and can feel like they’re less fortunate than others. I’ve definitely felt jealous than others during the 12 years that I have lived. But I’ve come to accept that the less knowledge, power or wealth that you have, the more you become motivated to work or try harder to get the things that you desire. That’s why I’d advise someone to do more with less.

 

  Saba Ifkhar, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Wednesday, Dec 21, 2016

If you had to make a deal with the devil, what would you ask for to make it worthwhile?

For me, the devil is that constant, subconscious voice at the back of my mind that tempts me to go astray. He’s like a guilty pleasure – he makes you do something that’s wrong while telling you at the same time that it’s right. I would ask him to leave me alone for good so that I can be a better person. Being the devil’s plaything only spells trouble.

 

  Saba Ifkhar, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Wednesday, Dec 14, 2016

Name one “war against…” you think this world needs?

There are so many people around us that are treated differently just because of their nationality o skin colour. Honestly, they don’t deserve to be treated differently. They are just like us. We are all humans. No one deserves to be punished when they haven’t done anything wrong. This is why the world needs a war against racism.

 

  Saba Ifkhar, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Wednesday, Dec 07, 2016

 

What subject would you remove from the curriculum?

Definitely music! Most students can hold a note to save their lives, so I don’t see the point of having music lessons in both primary and secondary school. Music could be an elective for students who really want to pursue a career in that field, but it definitely shouldn’t be mandatory. Plus, I think we all can agree that century-old hymns are out of date and boring. We should replace music with self-study lessons, so we can spend our time catching up on subjects that truly matter!

 

  Aujia Jshandeep Kaur, 17, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Wednesday, June 01, 2016

What out-of-classroom learning experience should your school offer?

My school should organize more tours outside Hong Kong, especially to places like Germany, which has a rich historical background. However, a visit shouldn’t all be about learning history. Students can learn many important things from such trips, for example, the people’s way of life and their traditions, and how different we are from them. Maybe we could copy some of their good points.

 

  Gurung Agisha, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Wednesday, May 11, 2016

  How much does it cost a family of four each month in HK?

To have a good living standard, a family of four needs HK$40,000 or more. This would cover all their living expenses, such as rent, water and electricity bills, food and transportation. With good money management, they could even save up for future medical insurance.

 

 

  Bashir Henna, 17, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Wednesday, May 04, 2016

If you could change one thing about Hong Kong, what would it be?

How about the education system? The recent spate of suicides has shown the kind of pressure faced by students in Hong Kong. They have to get good results in the HKDSE to get into university. Therefore, a less intense education system could ease the stress on students and help bring back the smiles.

 

  Ansar Aneeta, 17, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Wednesday, Apr 27, 2016

  Is university worth it? Do you really need a degree to get a good job?

Going to university is not just about the piece of paper you get at the end. You should not underestimate the experience of becoming self-reliant, meeting people from other parts of the world, and making friends from different walks of life. It is a life-charging experience and is undoubtedly worth it.

 

 

  Kaur Mukhjot, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Friday, Mar 04, 2016

Fun with zombies - A sheep in wolf’s clothing

My zombie apocalypse choice of weapon is…*drumroll*….A ZOMBIE ITSELF. Being a serious Walking Dead fan, I’ve always wanted to live the life of a zombie. So I’ll just tear open a zombie, put its guts on myself and walk among them. Oh yes!

 

  Narz Iraj, 17, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Tuesday, Feb 23, 2016

  Should primary school students learn simplified Chinese?

Traditional Chinese has long been the preferred style in Hong Kong, but that doesn’t mean we have to hold on to it forever. Simplified Chinese is comparatively easier, and faster to learn, especially for primary students.  The beauty of simplified Chinese characters is in the name: they are simplified. They contain fewer strokes and can be easier to remember for new learners,

Traditional Chinese embodies the romantic, historical elements of language that makes it far better suited to arts and design, for example, calligraphy. Simplified  Chinese is better for daily use, and so it should definitely be encouraged. After all,simplified Chinese characters are considered acceptable by the Hong Kong Examinations and Assessments Authority, So it should not be a problem for primary students to learn simplified Chinese instead of traditional, and do well in exams.

The debate over using traditional or simplified  Chinese has been a cultural battlefield between Hong Kong and China for decades. As  Hong Kong is a part of China, it is important that Hong Kong citizens connect with mainlanders. And as primary school students are the future of Hong Kong, they should learn simplified Chinese to enhance ties with our motherland.

The existence of two concurrent language systems has always hindererd communication between the mainland and Hong Kong. If primary school students were to learn simplified Chinese,It would prove beneficial for our city’s future.

 

 

  Narz Iraj, 17, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Tuesday, Feb 23, 2016

  Should primary school students learn simplified Chinese?

Traditional Chinese has long been the preferred style in Hong Kong, but that doesn’t mean we have to hold on to it forever. Simplified Chinese is comparatively easier, and faster to learn, especially for primary students.  The beauty of simplified Chinese characters is in the name: they are simplified. They contain fewer strokes and can be easier to remember for new learners,

Traditional Chinese embodies the romantic, historical elements of language that makes it far better suited to arts and design, for example, calligraphy. Simplified  Chinese is better for daily use, and so it should definitely be encouraged. After all,simplified Chinese characters are considered acceptable by the Hong Kong Examinations and Assessments Authority, So it should not be a problem for primary students to learn simplified Chinese instead of traditional, and do well in exams.

The debate over using traditional or simplified  Chinese has been a cultural battlefield between Hong Kong and China for decades. As  Hong Kong is a part of China, it is important that Hong Kong citizens connect with mainlanders. And as primary school students are the future of Hong Kong, they should learn simplified Chinese to enhance ties with our motherland.

The existence of two concurrent language systems has always hindererd communication between the mainland and Hong Kong. If primary school students were to learn simplified Chinese,It would prove beneficial for our city’s future.

 

 

  Kaur Mukhjot, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Wednesday, Feb 17, 2016

What makes you a Hongkonger?

Chinese is my second language and I consider myself more a Hongkonger than an American or an Indian. I have tones of local friends and I love Chinese food. What’s more, I celebrate traditional Chinese festivals more than Indian festival. Last but not least, for me, Eason Chan’s music is love, and that’s reason enough to consider myself a Hongkonger.

 

  Kaur Mukhjot, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Wednesday, Feb 03, 2016

Should Hong Kong have its own army?

Hong Kong having its own army? Are you joking? What would you need an army here for? Hong Kong is not a war-torn city and the chances of us being attacked by a foreign force are very slim.

Although I agree that having our own army would create a lot of job opportunities for Hongkongers, the disadvantages would outweigh the benefits. I wouldn’t want to make Beijing angry. So I think we should leave military matters to the People’s Liberation Army.

 

 

  Naz Iraj, 17, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Wednesday, Jan 27, 2016

Who should be the one to pay for a date?

The male and female should both pay: It’s only fair. So what if the guy offers to pay? Not all men do that because they want to. They’re just forced to follow society’s rules, and these old ideas about men paying should be gone by now. If a woman is free enough to stand on her own two feet, then she can pay for her own meal.

A few treats here and there from both sides are OK, but completely relying on the other person is just wrong.

 

 

   Narz Iraj, 17, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Tuesday, Jan 19, 2016

Should Putonghua be used as the medium of instruction in Chinese lessons?

Hongkongers using Putonghua may enhance the emotional ties between the people and their motherland, but it does not mean we should start using the language as the medium of instruction in Chinese lessons. Hong Kong as always been a Cantonese dominant region, with Cantonese as its mother tongue.

As Beijing tries to push its way into Hong Kong, teaching students- the future of Hong Kong – China’s spoken language seems only logical. However, we are international and multicultural city. Besides ethnic minority students, local students who speak mostly Cantonese in everyday life will be affected. It’s true that you can write what you say in Putonghua, but it doesn’t make learning Chinese any easier. If you want to explain and a=make students understand the language system of standardised modern Chinese, then it is obviously better to choose a language that students are more familiar with.

It’s not as if Cantonese speakers are going to learn to write Chinese any better if they are taught in Putonghua. Moreover, using Putonghua will be equally troublesome for teachers. The majority of teachers are form Hong Kong and, therefore Cantonese speakers. These teachers would have to take a extra time to understand the lesson content themselves before delivering it to the students. Yes, they can take Putonghua courses, but to teach it is another issue. Furthermore there is no concrete evidence that using Putonghua to teach Chinese can effectively improve students’ language proficiency.

Of course, evidence from the mainland should not be considered, as Putonghua is their mother tongue. Lastly, Cantonese is not only the city’s language, but also is a platform that differentiates Hong Kong from China as a cultural and political distinction of Hong Kong from the rest of the mainland. Therefore, Hong Kong cannot afford the death of Cantonese, and Putonghua should not be used as a medium of instruction in Chinese lessons.

 

  Nariz Iraj, 17, St Margaret’s Girls’ College

  Posted: Wednesday, Dec 16, 2015

Should the government have any role in choosing a university council chairman?

I don’t think the government should have any role in choosing a university council chairman. I think it’s best if people from within the university are responsible for it, as they are familiar with the environment and university’s needs. This would be a better way to select the most suitable candidate to become the university’s chairman. Besides, the government has other important issues to think about rather than worrying about who the next university council chairman is going to be.

 

  Nariz Iraj, 17, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015

Should TSA exams marked on a simple pass/fail basis?

Definitely not! Marking TSA exams on a simple pass/fail basis would not do Primary Three students justice. If the authorities don’t plan to get rid of the TSAs, they should at least take proper results from them. Students have the right to know how well or how badly they performed, and simply stating “pass” or “fail” takes that right away from them.

Besides, it is also demotivating. For example, if a student fails, they will not be motivated to put effort into their studies. And if a student passes, they will not know how well they performed, or in which area they could use improvement. So using a simple pass/fail basis to mark? Not at all! 

 

  Erika Olvina, 17, St Margaret’s Girls’ College

  Posted: Friday, Dec 04, 2015

Happiness is sleeting

The best thing about winter would definitely have to be the fact that you get to wear hoodies and boots all season long and feel warm and cozy the whole time.

 

  Narz Iraj, 17, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015

Should we remove trams from Central?

Trams are cheap and eco-friendly means of transport, but their disadvantage outweighs the benefits. Other transport systems are much faster and more reliable. Another problem is, unlike cars and buses, trams are simply not suitable for present-day Hong Kong because they run on tracks along the city’s busy street.

While buses can move around obstacles, trams must wait for the road to clear before they can continue their journey. In addition, their slow speed and frequent stops worsens the city’s traffic congestion. This may not bother tourists who enjoy a tram ride, but it won’t help Hong Kong’s air pollution problem. These days, most governments are keen to implement energy-saving plans.

By removing trams between Central and Admiralty, we can save a huge amount of electricity. Moreover, trams are not the first choice of transport for many Hong Kongers who prefer cars, trains or buses. As former government town planner Sit Kwok-Keung said : “MTR services cover the whole of Hong Kong island, so why do we still insist on a mode of transportation that is slow and carries few passengers?”

It’s about the time we let go of the idea that trams are part of Hong Kong’s heritage and should be preserved. If preserving our culture is so important, then including trams in a transport museum does not sound like a bad idea. Trams belong in museums, not on the city’s streets.

 

  Nariz Iraj, 17, St Margaret’s Girls’ College

  Posted: Wednesday, Nov 04, 2015

Should the government spend money on creating more pet-friendly spaces?

Yes! Hong Kong is home to many animal-lovers and pet-owners, so the city badly needs more pet-friendly places. Keeping pets helps people lower their stress levels and makes them happy. For that to happen, the pets need to be healthy as well, so staying at home isn’t going to help.

Most housing estates and public places such as shopping malls and sports venues do not allow pets, so where are they supposed to go? The least the government can do is to set up a park for pets in every housing estate.

 

  Nariz Iraj, 17, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Friday, Oct 02, 2015

A Jolie-good show! Angelina Jolie! Need I say more? She is strong, independent, and kind-hearted, so she is the perfect candidate to lead the country

  Maryam Gul, 15, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Friday, Oct 02, 2015

Queen of America? “Media Queen” Oprah Winfrey would be the perfect leader. She knows how to act in front of a camera, and her candidacy would generate great interest among Africa-American women. Best of all, she would be able to finance her own campaign without seeking donations from rich people. (And if she became president, Josh Peck would be less likely to run her over).

 

  Narz Iraj, 17, St Margaret’s Girls’ College

  Posted: Posted: Wednesday, Sep 30, 2015

Should HK spend so much money on professional sports?

Sports have a big impact on the public. Professional sports can help develop a national identity among citizens. Sports bring competition, so when people come together to support their country, relationships are strengthened and there’s more social harmony.

There’s something about sports that goes beyond social, political and ethnic barriers. It’s a powerful tool that can help unite people. Sporting events can also be used to raise funds for important social and medical causes, for example, cancer research. Then there are health benefits.

Sports can raise awareness about the importance of a healthy and active lifestyle. So, investing in professional sports is good for society.

 

  Narj Iraj, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Friday, Sep 25, 2015

You‘re the man! We live in a world where face-to-face communication is so rare. So the best way would just be to act like a man and walk up to the person and start a conversation!

  Kaur Mukhjot, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Friday, Sep 25, 2015

Active lifestyle The key is to join more extra- curriculum activities like sports clubs and interact more with students.

 

  Narz Iraj, 17, St Margaret’s Girls’ College

  Posted: Wednesday, Sep 23, 2015

Is there a fair minimum wage for people working in Hong Kong?

A fair minimum wage for workers in Hong Kong would be when the low-skilled workers can afford to pay soaring rents, and buy food and other essentials. Ideally, they should be able to save a part of their salary, too.

But because the cost of living in Hong Kong is so high, that is never going to happen. When the minimum wage increases, the cost of living also increases. Really, this means the minimum wage hasn’t gone up. But putting up the minimum wage might not be the answer.

If the minimum wage is higher, bosses will probably just employ people for shorter shifts. Or they will hire less staff. These means minimum wage workers will still be left with the same salary at the end of the month. Some might not even get a job in the first place. I don’t think there can ever be such a thing as a fare minimum wage.

 

  Nariz Iraj, 17, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Wednesday, Sep 16, 2015

Do countries with a lot of open spaces have a responsibility to accept refugees?

Forget about responsibility. Countries with wide-open spaces should accept refuges from war-torn countries out of compassion at least. They seem to be the only ray of hope for the asylum-seekers. However, a country may refuse to take refugees if it is facing serious economic or social problems.

Overall, I can’t think of any reasons why a prosperous country should refuse to accept refugees.

 

  Sundeep Kaur, 17, St Margaret’s Girls’ College

  Posted: Friday, May 22, 2015

Train Young Brian

Tutoring kids is not a bad choice. Tutoring not only enhances our own knowledge, but also means we can stay in air-conditioning the whole time!

  Cheung Yuk-man, 17, St Margaret’s Girls’ College

  Posted: Friday, May 22, 2015

House of mouse

Disneyland, duh. How cool would it be to bring joy to families from all around the world, and help make unforgettable memories for someone’s childhood.

 

  Rai Anna-L, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Wednesday, May 06, 2015

Should teenagers have privacy right?

I think many adults worry: if teenagers had privacy rights, what skeletons would they hide in their closet? And adults’ concerns are not groundless, considering the never-ending string of teen scandals: drugs, compensated dating, alcohol, and much more. However, not giving teens privacy on the pretext of it being for own safety might not be the wisest choice.

The teenage years are a period when almost everyone goes through a process of self-discovery. We are desperately trying to be more independent. Therefore, we need the space to take this journey without it being invaded by others – some lessons in life are better learned through experiences and mistakes than taught by words.

Constant supervision of our daily events will only suffocate our growth. Of course, the right to privacy doesn’t mean we want no guidance in our lives. It simply means that the reins of control are in our hands, while adults act as advisers.

Trust is a crucial foundation of all relationships. Infringing in a teen’s privacy might be interpreted as a sign of mistrust. Not only does it put a strain on relationships, we could end up isolating ourselves even more from our parents, in a show of defiance.

Snooping around won’t do the trick, either. The only solution is to respect our privacy and establish a sense of trust through constant interaction. By doing so, adolescents will choose to share information that would otherwise be taken by force without our knowledge. So, are teenagers entitled to privacy rights? I do honestly believe giving us privacy rather than not is the lesser of the two evils. My answer is definitely yes.

 

  Asha Limbu, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Friday, April 24, 2015

The wisest eight words I know

Quotes, by far, have been the most influential thing in my life. One that has had a very significant influence on me is: “Never look where you fall, look where you slip.” These eight words speak volume, and taught me to look at failure with a new eye. I no longer view it as the end; instead, each falter is now a learning opportunity, and a chance to improve myself. This quote makes the existence of another quote even more meaningful: “You won’t learn until you fall.”

 

  Sarah So, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Friday, March 13, 2015

Forever and always

Nine is my favorite number. In Chinese culture, number nine means ever-lasting. It is also the highest single-digit number before 10. It stands for completeness and eternity.

 

  Naz Iraj, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Tuesday, February 24, 2015

I don’t see any positives in the flood of mainland tourists to Hong Kong. As a Hong Kong resident, I only see them hogging what’s rightfully ours, regardless of whether it’s a pregnant woman coming to give birth here, or just a mainland tourist buying everything he sees. The effects of this huge influx are visible everywhere. Undeniably, some groups have benefited immensely from the rising tourist numbers. But many others feel they are getting a raw deal.

  Rai Anna-L, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Saturday, February 14, 2015

Attend school, go to a tutorial centre, arrive home and either do homework or revise until late. This sums up the schedule of most Hong Kong students. However, we give education the priority at the expense of our health.

Hong Kong is a competitive city, where children don’t take part in many outdoor activities. This inactive lifestyle means childhood obesity has become a serious problem here. Obesity could lead to serious health issues, such as diabetes and heart disease, later in life. What is the point in having university degrees in one hand when we have disease in the others?

We need to change our priorities. We should put a lot of effort into our studies, but also set aside some time to do exercise every day.

Despite what most people think, academic degrees don’t guarantee success. What matters is your character, and that can be refined through exercise. For example, playing sports is a good way to improve your self-discipline and endurance. Moreover, it teaches what you cannot find in textbooks-how to deal with failure. This skill is useful in all stages of life.

Needless to say, you should not completely ignore your studies. But we cannot study when we are sick. We should be in a good physical condition to continue our education and have a successful career. Health should always top the to-do list.

Right now, we are not only encouraging lethargy, but also ignoring a future public health risk. This definitely has to stop.

Rai Anna-L won the Best Face Off award at the 2014 Young Post Junior Reporter of the Year Awards

  Mercado Hazel Katreena, 16,

  St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Friday, February 13, 2015

It doesn’t matter to me how I will spending my Valentine’s Day; it only matter who I will be spending it with. Whether eating take-out on the couch or eating in a fancy candlelit dinner, as long as I am with that special someone, I’ll be satisfied.

  Asha Limbu, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Monday, February 13, 2015

Instead of celebrating it lavishly, I’d prefer to celebrate it in an environmentally-friendly way. Every day at school we create an ocean of waste paper, so why not reuse it to make thousands of paper stars? Your loved ones will appreciate your effort, plus you’ll also prove your love to Mother Nature.


  Mukhjot Bajwa, 15, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Thursday, February 12, 2015

A visit to the mainland can help HongKongers strengthen their national identity and sense of belongings to their motherland. They can also explore new places and learn about different cultures and people’s daily lifestyle. Apart from these benefits, the trip could help locals boost their Putonghua skills.

  Katie Hung, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Friday, November 28, 2014

Making the smart decision

Where would I be without my smartphone? With my iPhone in my pocket, I always feel comfortable and safe. I get to keep in touch with my friends who are studying overseas. It feels like they are standing right next to me. I want to thank smartphones for bringing people a little closer in this big world.

  Harmandeep Kaur, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Friday, November 28, 2014 

Cleaning up our mess 

How many of us have actually shown gratitude to the school janitors? While we are busy thanking our family, teachers or friends, janitors shouldn’t be left out. They spend their time keeping the school clean, helping us lead a hygienic school life. So, I would like to give a big bucketful of thanks to the janitors. Thank you!

   Rai Arlin L, 17, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Before saying whether Hong Kong is racist or not, I think is important to remember that no country or city is ever completely free from racism.

There will be individual who are racist everywhere. There will be those who treat people differently because of the colour of their skin or because of their ethnicity.

But the key point to note is whether these people make up the majority or the minority of residents of a city. In my opinion, the racist people in Hong Kong are in the minority.

Racism comes from a lack of understanding. People often believe racial stereotypes because of the way that race is portrayed in society. They believe what they see in movies or on TV rather than having opinions based on the people of different races they meet themselves. 

But because Hong Kong is such an international city, there are so many different  people from different backgrounds and countries. People from all over the world live and work happily together in our city.

This means the public in Hong Kong are quite open-minded and have a lot of contact with different cultures. This lowers the likelihood of citizens being racist. Another point to note is that, in most cases, we learn to reject racial stereotypes from a young age.

In Hong Kong, it is not uncommon to see schools holding multi-cultural days or charities organising activities celebrating different cultural  to enhance people’s awareness and acceptance of those cultures. This helps the younger generation to learn about the importance od social integration, making them less likely to be racist.

Despite all this good work, there will still be some people who are racist, though. But we cannot say Hong Kong is racist simply because of a small group of people who are biased against “foreigners”.

As the saying goes, “A rotten apple doesn't make the whole barrel bad”.

  Rai Arlin L, 17, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Saturday, November 15, 2014 

Should TVB give journalists, instead of celebs or pageant winners, more opportunities to host lifestyle shows?

Most television broadcasting stations hire celebrities or pageant winners to host their shows in a bid to gain more viewers, and TVB is no exception. However, I believe that TVB should give more opportunities to journalists to host lifestyle shows than celebs and beauty queens.

One of the fields of journalism includes lifestyle, which focuses on the ever-changing society, giving potential candidates the qualifications to “talk” about it. Equipped with a vast amount of knowledge in terms of lifestyle, trends and fashion, they would help draw in viewers like moths to a flame.

Hosting a programme is more than just talking about a certain subjects; you need to showcase your knowledge in a fun and interesting way. Journalists tell interesting, factual stories, so they are perfect for this kind of programme. Stars such as Carol Cheng might add glamour, but it is vital for a show to have substance as well. Quality matters, and before long, viewers will take an interest in the programme depending on the host’s performance.

From an economic perspective, hiring journalists would be cheaper for TVB. Celebrities’ fees are much higher than what most reporters earn, and TVB wouldn't have to pay scriptwriters, as journalists could write their own copy. This would TVB reduce its costs while maintaining the quality of its programming. 

Therefore, journalists deserve more opportunities to host lifestyle shows because they have the right training for the job.

  Kaur Amritpal, 17, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Thursday, November 13, 2014

What do you want tell your parents/teachers about Occupy Central?

The thing I would like to tell my parents about Occupy Central is that it’s a fight for democracy and protesters are not occupying the area without any objectives.

 

 

  Rai Anna-L, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Thursday, October 30, 2014

What’s the one thing you wish your  teacher knew about you?

I sincerely hope all the teachers would realize that a class is like a private cult group and we will never tell on any of our fellow members no matter how bad the deed. And this is not just a matter of loyalty; it’s all about trust. 

 

  Sonia lftkhar, 20, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Thursday, October 23, 2014

Our school is huge, and we have good facilities such as clean, comfortable washrooms and play areas. But there should be a ”Personal  Care Department’ which provides towels, shampoo,  bodywash , sanitary napkins, bobby pins, and basic medication like Panadol. There is a great demand for these things in almost every school.

  Rai Arlin-L,17, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Thursday, October 23, 2014

I think a study room is a must.since there are many many free lessons and homework periods .it would be wise to give a room to students who want to study .This would be especially useful when a whole class is having a free period .With no teacher supervision , some student would set their books aside and start chatting. This would be a nuisance for those who want to study. For them, the  study room would come in very handy.

  Sonia Iftkhar, 20, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Thursday, October 16, 2014

It has to be lou meen-noodles in a small, plastic bag. Ethnic minority children don’t have much choice, mostly because the food is not suitable for Muslims or vegetarians. Moreover, I feel that is quite unhealthy to eat from plastic bag rather than a container.


  Rai Arlin-L,17, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

  Posted: Monday, October 13, 2014

No more wasted time!

As the protests showed us, you never know what life is going to throw at you, so it’s important to be prepared. Chin Teik is the founder and president of Chin Teik Consulting based in Hong Kong. He has a long history of training business people on how to be more organised and improve their leadership skills, and is inspired by Stephen Covey’s 1989 book 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.

Teik sat down to share some of experience and knowledge, that you can apply to your  school and daily life, to use your time more efficiently.

Everybody makes schedules-it’s just that many of them don’t work. But there are some common mistakes people make when creating a schedule that you should know about- and more importantly, know how to fix.

A typical schedule has dozens of things we need to plan, and we often let the urgent tasks overwhelm the important ones. “First things first: take time to figure out what is important out what is important, “says Teik”. “Reflect on your purpose in life and what you value.” It is importance to get your work done on time.